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Thread: maine deer yards

  1. #1
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    remember a post on some site about deer yards and how VT put together a map of these known yards. was wondering if maine has ever done something similar. be interesting to check out and maybe find some yotes.
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  2. #2
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    Seems like yotes are everywhere now Adam. I found a den between The belle marsh rd. and the Ledges golf course this fall. PM me sometime and I can explain how to get to it.

  3. #3
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    It looks like IF&W has signed a good agreement with Plum Creek to better manage deer yards and wintering areas. Too bad all timber companies don't get involved like this.



    Maine Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife
    For Immediate Release January 4, 2007
    Contact: Paul Davis, Plum Creek 207- 453-2527, Ext. 123
    Gene Dumont, MDIFW 207- 287-5253

    Editor’s Note: Attached photo is of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Commissioner Commissioner Roland D. Martin and Plum Creek’s Paul Davis shaking hands after signing the agreement.
    IFW, Plum Creek to Manage Forest Lands for Deer
    AUGUSTA, Maine – Plum Creek Timber Company and The Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife have signed an agreement for management of winter habitat for white-tailed deer. Commissioner Roland D. Martin and Paul Davis, General Manager of Plum Creek’s Northeast Region, signed the agreement on Thursday, January 4, 2007.

    “We are very pleased to have cooperatively developed this partnership with Plum Creek,” said Commissioner Martin, This is a very important step forward and a milestone for the long-term winter habitat management for deer in this region.”

    The Long-Term Deer Wintering Area Agreement recognizes the importance of proper forest management to sustainable wildlife populations and ensures that important deer wintering areas (“deer yards”) will be conserved and cooperatively managed for both sustainable timber resources and critical deer winter habitat.

    This Deer Wintering Area Management Agreement with Plum Creek covers over 32,000 acres of forested land in Somerset, Franklin and Piscataquis Counties. The agreement allows Plum Creek to harvest softwood and hardwood while maintaining coniferous canopy cover for wintering deer. Areas opened up through timber harvesting will contribute immediate forage from the tops of felled trees, and sunlit areas for new tree growth, and yearlong browsing.

    “Plum Creek is pleased to participate in this voluntary agreement that will benefit the deer herd, wildlife enthusiasts and the sporting community while providing jobs for our employees and a sustainable supply of timber to the many forest products mills in the area” said Paul Davis, General Manager for Plum Creek.

    Wildlife biologists consider quality deer winter shelter the major limiting factor in sustaining deer populations in Maine. In addition, properly managed softwood stands provide habitat for a variety of upland wildlife species.

    Healthy deer populations in Maine depend on wintering areas that provide shelter and open space at the same time. Evergreen canopies keep snow depth underneath to a minimum and allow deer easy mobility while they conserve energy. Open areas within the shelter portions provide winter forage on which deer depend to survive. Maintaining a strong deer population over time depends on protecting large stands of mature hemlocks, spruce and fir to shelter deer from cold, wind, and deep snow. The agreement allows the company to have a continuous supply of pulp and sawlogs, while maintaining the stands that provide shelter for wintering deer. This is ensured by providing that the wintering area complex is composed of mature, close-canopy softwood stands to provide shelter. The remainder of the yard can be in younger conifer age-classes to provide browse for feeding, and eventually future shelter.

    “Plum Creek has voluntarily added two very important ingredients to this agreement that we have not encountered with other major forest landowners,” said Gene Dumont, Wildlife Management Section Supervisor with IFW, “One, Plum Creek has turned the land management decisions of the Deer Wintering Areas over to their Biological Staff, and second, Plum Creek has initiated a plan to transfer this agreement to the next landowner in the future. These are very significant initiatives, that highlight Plum Creek’s commitment to the agreement.”
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  4. #4
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    That's good news for the deer!

  5. #5
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    They have been mapped by IF&W. We use them all the time in our land use planning work. They are not yet readily avalable on the net however. You might be able to get some information through the Beginning with Habitat program.

    irving, Allagash, and IF&W signed one of the largest agreements in maine to protect DWAs. I think most companies work with IF&W. Its the smaller woodlot owners that hack without regard.

  6. #6
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    thanks jdk. theres's some interesting info on their site. here's a link to the map section. i have yet to dive too far into these, but looks good.

    Beginning with Habitat maps
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  7. #7
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    remember a post on some site about deer yards and how VT put together a map of these known yards. was wondering if maine has ever done something similar. be interesting to check out and maybe find some yotes.[/b]

    I have a deer yard behind my camp and I've listened to the coyotes howl on many occasions. I'm not aware of any deer yard maps available to the general public but I heard runors last year of some deer yard protection legistation to keep the loggers from cutting into them or clearing them.
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  8. #8
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    I watched a show last year I think on the discovery channel all about white tail and their yarding habits. Awesome show! I was amazed to learn that the deer will travel 70 to 100 miles to the same yard every year by instincts, etc.. I did see lots of information about VT in these studies. Mostly northern kingdom (?)

  9. #9
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    That's great news. Maybe I'll see a buck in a couple years.

  10. #10
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    It looks like IF&W has signed a good agreement with Plum Creek to better manage deer yards and wintering areas. Too bad all timber companies don't get involved like this.
    Maine Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife
    For Immediate Release January 4, 2007
    Contact: Paul Davis, Plum Creek 207- 453-2527, Ext. 123
    Gene Dumont, MDIFW 207- 287-5253

    Editor’s Note: Attached photo is of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Commissioner Commissioner Roland D. Martin and Plum Creek’s Paul Davis shaking hands after signing the agreement.
    IFW, Plum Creek to Manage Forest Lands for Deer
    AUGUSTA, Maine – Plum Creek Timber Company and The Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife have signed an agreement for management of winter habitat for white-tailed deer. Commissioner Roland D. Martin and Paul Davis, General Manager of Plum Creek’s Northeast Region, signed the agreement on Thursday, January 4, 2007.

    “We are very pleased to have cooperatively developed this partnership with Plum Creek,” said Commissioner Martin, This is a very important step forward and a milestone for the long-term winter habitat management for deer in this region.”

    The Long-Term Deer Wintering Area Agreement recognizes the importance of proper forest management to sustainable wildlife populations and ensures that important deer wintering areas (“deer yards”) will be conserved and cooperatively managed for both sustainable timber resources and critical deer winter habitat.

    This Deer Wintering Area Management Agreement with Plum Creek covers over 32,000 acres of forested land in Somerset, Franklin and Piscataquis Counties. The agreement allows Plum Creek to harvest softwood and hardwood while maintaining coniferous canopy cover for wintering deer. Areas opened up through timber harvesting will contribute immediate forage from the tops of felled trees, and sunlit areas for new tree growth, and yearlong browsing.

    “Plum Creek is pleased to participate in this voluntary agreement that will benefit the deer herd, wildlife enthusiasts and the sporting community while providing jobs for our employees and a sustainable supply of timber to the many forest products mills in the area” said Paul Davis, General Manager for Plum Creek.

    Wildlife biologists consider quality deer winter shelter the major limiting factor in sustaining deer populations in Maine. In addition, properly managed softwood stands provide habitat for a variety of upland wildlife species.

    Healthy deer populations in Maine depend on wintering areas that provide shelter and open space at the same time. Evergreen canopies keep snow depth underneath to a minimum and allow deer easy mobility while they conserve energy. Open areas within the shelter portions provide winter forage on which deer depend to survive. Maintaining a strong deer population over time depends on protecting large stands of mature hemlocks, spruce and fir to shelter deer from cold, wind, and deep snow. The agreement allows the company to have a continuous supply of pulp and sawlogs, while maintaining the stands that provide shelter for wintering deer. This is ensured by providing that the wintering area complex is composed of mature, close-canopy softwood stands to provide shelter. The remainder of the yard can be in younger conifer age-classes to provide browse for feeding, and eventually future shelter.

    “Plum Creek has voluntarily added two very important ingredients to this agreement that we have not encountered with other major forest landowners,” said Gene Dumont, Wildlife Management Section Supervisor with IFW, “One, Plum Creek has turned the land management decisions of the Deer Wintering Areas over to their Biological Staff, and second, Plum Creek has initiated a plan to transfer this agreement to the next landowner in the future. These are very significant initiatives, that highlight Plum Creek’s commitment to the agreement.”[/b]
    What a f@#$#@ joke! Plum Creek just mowed the s@#! out of the major deer yard last year along the Kennebec River between here and Greenville. I wouldn't trust them one bit......
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