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Thread: Fawn Survival - Interesting read

  1. #11
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    Most people would readily agree that having predators on the landscape is a good thing. The basic premise here has validity...but obviously doesn't adequately address all of the potential variables.
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  2. #12
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    The Ct. D.E.E.P estimates fawn mortality is around 80%.
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorsman View Post
    Iíve learned over the past few years habitat, alternative prey, and the predators themselves (possibly genetics) can alter the outcome of a study. The link below tells a fawn predation tale from New Brunswick during the late 1990s.


    https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/380...n_tab_contents
    Interesting read.

    When people talk about coyotes as an invasive, I wonder if we think about the time when there were no canid species in New England correctly- that situation was the aberration, not the time pre/post when there was a canid predator on the landscape. This would also possibly negate discussion of introducing wolves (absent from the landscape about 1840?) as well - the coyotes have filled that niche, even to the point of having wolf-like behavior- packs, etc.
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  4. #14
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    Depending on when a person decides what normal was would determine species presence. Is normal 300 years ago, 3,000 or 30,000 years ago? Such an argument could bring us into creation versus evolution discussion.

    Regardless, re-introducing wolves would not eradicate coyotes. Coyotes continue to exist in Yellowstone where wolves were reintroduced during the 1990s. From an ecosystem perspective I would argue coyotes do not fill a wolf niche because a coyote is an omnivore taking advantage of seasonal abundant food. A wolf is more of an obligate meat eater and has the ability to take large ungulates (moose); though depending which wolf species discussed could create different arguments of effects on moose populations.
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