Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Second half of Browselines 2018 Maine deer season.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Central VT.
    Posts
    3,457

    Default Second half of Browselines 2018 Maine deer season.

    We drove to camp in a snowstorm on Tuesday of the third week. By morning there was about 10" of snow on top of a bunch that was already there. Single numbers on the thermometer and very windy. About the same conditions for the next 3 days plus more snow a couple times during the rest of the trip. A logging operation (actually 2) kept me from going anywhere near the area where I have shot my last 3 Maine bucks and not being able to get through many of the roads with all the snow and the steep hills, limited us as to where we could hunt. A couple of the guys had chains on their rear tires but still couldn't get up the hills and more than once we had to pull each other out of the ditches. There was not much deer movement the first few days but things heated up about Tuesday of the last week. The bucks were starting to roam around more, but we saw little sign of them staying with any does. The deep snow kept us from getting to the top of most of the mountains (those Western Maine mountains are steep for a bunch of old guys like us) but the deer didn't seem to have a problem. I had a couple close calls with what I thought were big bucks but never did actually see one. The youngest of us (64 years old) saw 2 small bucks that he believed he could have shot but passed on them.


    The highlight of the time we were up there was Thanksgiving day when the camp owner (80 years old) drove out about 1/2 mile off a main logging road, neither one plowed, and walked from the landing down a long, straight skid road that was free of brush. He uses a safari sling and 2 ski poles to get around and limits himself to about 3/4 of a mile a day, a little less with all the snow we had. After walking down the road about 200 yards, a nice buck stepped off the bank and into the road and started walking directly away from him. It was a long ways off but he had no trouble seeing the antlers. He had quite a time getting the ski pole straps off his wrists and shedding them and getting the gun on the deer. He couldn't hold it very well standing so dropped to his knees and rested the guy on one knee. He held on the bucks butt hole as that was all he had to shoot at other than the back of its head. He fired and the buck bounded over the bank. It took him about 20 minutes to gather his stuff and get down to where the deer was when he shot. As it turned out the distance was 215 yards using a rangefinder the next day with his brother standing where the deer was. He found a bloody bed about 40 yards from where the deer was hit and jumped it. He couldn't get a shot. Followed it very slowly for a few more hours, found more beds, lost the track among other deer as it didn't bleed unless bedded, and finally decided to back out and get back to the truck which he knew was going to take him several hours as he was spent.


    The next morning we all went in (4 of us) to find the buck. The guy who shot went in on the track with his 78 year old brother and me and the other guy went in from different directions towards the GPS point that the guy who shot the deer had taken when he lost the track. When he shot the buck it turns out it had been following a doe and is probably why it walked down the logging road about 40 yards after coming down off the bank. The two of us that came in from other directions, started looking for buck tracks as we figured they would take us to the wounded buck (which we figured was dead). There were quite a lot of deer tracks in the area and eventually my buddy followed deer tracks to within a few feet of the dead buck. It was covered with snow and tough to see, having crawled under a dead spruce, but he spotted it. I was within 150 ft of him following another deer track towards the dead buck, when he got on the radio and told us he had found it. It ended up dying about 400 ft from where he lost it's track and the GPS point.


    The guy that shot it and his brother got to the spot in about 45 minutes. We all took a few pictures and then built a fire. The guy that shot the deer was very happy as he held out little hope of finding the deer. Nothing had touched it overnight. In fact we never saw any coyote tracks the whole time we were there except for an earlier trip the first few days of the season. The 80 year old cleaned out the deer, we had lunch and me and the youngest guy started dragging the deer. The 2 brothers had brought in a jet sled with them after we convinced them the night before that we could find the deer. It was all uphill if we dragged it back the way it came when it was shot so we took in the opposite way to a road that was .7 miles away. About 2 tenths further but either level ground or slightly down hill. After about 3 or more hours we got it down to the road and the other guy dragging went up the road and got his truck. As we were loading the deer a game warden came along and we had a good visit with him for over 1/2 hour. He checked the deer over and our licenses and had a second look at the guy who shot it when he saw his age on his license. The warden said he was pleased to see us out in the woods several miles hunting and not near the main road, hunting near where people were feeding deer and beside houses and a couple small deer yards plus areas where people were already feeding deer. He was going out to a big deer yard another 8 miles down the logging road from where he met us when he stopped. He said it was getting hammered so he just wanted to make sure everything was on the up and up as it was perfectly legal to hunt the yards.


    The deer ended up weighing 182 lbs and had 7 points. It was cleaned out and then some, as the bullet entered about 1 inch left of his butthole. What a mess inside. The deer was warm and steaming inside when gutted even though it was 7 or 8 degrees out.


    It was great that he got a deer as it has been a few years since he has gotten a Maine deer although he usually shoots one or 2 in NH with his rifle or crossbow. We had a good time like we always do, even though some days the hunting felt more like torture than hunting. If we had gotten another 6 inches of snow I'm not sure that we could have driven anywhere. This has happened to us 2 other times the last of the season since we started hunting Maine in 1984. Give me bare ground any day or 1 or 2 inches of snow. Most of the area I hunt around home in NH is blocked off due to the snow so I can't get within few miles of it and would have to walk. This leaves only a few chunks of bigger woods to hunt and most of the deer have moved into the low areas near towns. That means hunters are crowded into these areas. Not my thing to be around other hunters so I don't know how much hunting I'll do in NH this year. I've posted a few pictures below. The guy with the blaze orange camo coat is the one who shot the deer. All in all a good year for us and I am thankful I'm still able to put in an effort.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    330

    Default

    Great story and great buck!

    That bullet must have just barely missed breaking the pelvis. Would have been alot easier on you guys had that happened.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    202

    Default

    You "young kids" did well to find that deer Browse! The guy that shot it must have been some appreciative! As always, thanks for sharing your accounts and hunting adventures, always most enjoyable.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    812

    Default

    Crazy how well that buck blends in with a little snow on it. Good find!
    Born to hunt, forced to work.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    In the Oak Hickory plain.
    Posts
    4,972

    Default

    Great adventure! Experienced hunters know how to get the job done.
    Leave my rifle, my fishing pole, my traps, and leave me be.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Zone 10 MA. Zone 15/12 ME
    Posts
    260

    Default

    Great report. Glad to see you guys are still getting it done.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Southern Vermont
    Posts
    3,399

    Default

    The dude that spotted it must have pretty good eyes...its incredible how well that little snow on it makes it almost invisible. Glad to hear you had another good year in camp.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Central VT.
    Posts
    3,457

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sneaky_pete000 View Post
    The dude that spotted it must have pretty good eyes...its incredible how well that little snow on it makes it almost invisible. Glad to hear you had another good year in camp.
    Fresh buck tracks made during the early morning led him to within a few feet of it. The guy that shot it said the buck stunk a lot while he was on the trail the day before. The other bucks did all the work, as they went looking for him and could probably smell him for a quarter mile. I guess the other bucks didn't think he was much of a threat, lying there dead. Tracks from the dead buck were all snowed in from the snow overnight and all the wind.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Southern Vermont
    Posts
    3,399

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Browseline View Post
    Fresh buck tracks made during the early morning led him to within a few feet of it. The guy that shot it said the buck stunk a lot while he was on the trail the day before. The other bucks did all the work, as they went looking for him and could probably smell him for a quarter mile. I guess the other bucks didn't think he was much of a threat, lying there dead. Tracks from the dead buck were all snowed in from the snow overnight and all the wind.
    That makes sense. I shot a doe once, let her lay there as "bait" and other does came along sniffing her without any alarm. I just assumed it was because she was a doe, but I'm sure they'd investigate a buck smell too. Sounds like it was one for the memory banks.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    North Jersey Woods ( NJW)
    Posts
    5,077

    Default

    Sounds like another adventure for sure! Next year we’re going to have two sets of chains.A set for the front tires also our front end was all over the place with the chains only on the back. Of course we probably won’t need them ever again LOL

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •