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Thread: UP a River

  1. #1
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    Default UP a River

    Over 100 hunting/recreational camps in the Ottawa National Forest in Michigan's Upper Peninsula have to be removed or destroyed by January 1, 2017.

    ?UP a River? is a cultural documentary about the people who built decades of traditions around these camps. Laughs are shared, tears are shed and all agree that "goin' to camp" is something that everyone should experience at least once in their lifetime.


    http://www.upariver.net

  2. #2
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    Anyone who has a camp, attends a camp, or is thinking about a camp should watch the video in the link. It is an exceptionally well filmed documentary about camp culture and traditions filmed with the lingering undertone of knowing these camps will soon be lost. It is a long video but I highly recommend everyone giving it a watch. If the location of the camps were not spelled out in the video you could easily assume this was from the northeast.

    Thanks for sharing NH Mountains.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 802-603hunter View Post
    Anyone who has a camp, attends a camp, or is thinking about a camp should watch the video in the link. It is an exceptionally well filmed documentary about camp culture and traditions filmed with the lingering undertone of knowing these camps will soon be lost. It is a long video but I highly recommend everyone giving it a watch. If the location of the camps were not spelled out in the video you could easily assume this was from the northeast.

    Thanks for sharing NH Mountains.
    The same thing is happening all over the North country as large tracts of timber company land are bought by public entities. I think the agreement with the leaseholders on the Champion lands in the NEK allowed the leases to go on for the lifetime of the leaseholder. Whether it's 25 years like in the UP or a lifetime, it's not open ended and they aren't going to allow these leases to go on indefinitely on what is now public property.
    It's going to keep happening, as the properties become available there aren't many buyers other than land trusts or states and the federal government.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by RememberBaker View Post
    The same thing is happening all over the North country as large tracts of timber company land are bought by public entities. I think the agreement with the leaseholders on the Champion lands in the NEK allowed the leases to go on for the lifetime of the leaseholder. Whether it's 25 years like in the UP or a lifetime, it's not open ended and they aren't going to allow these leases to go on indefinitely on what is now public property.
    It's going to keep happening, as the properties become available there aren't many buyers other than land trusts or states and the federal government.
    I am not sure about the Champion Land terms, but what you state sounds familiar. One of my brothers friends has a family camp on what is now the Federal Refuge outside Island Pond. I could be wrong, but I think those arrangements were lifetime of the leaseholder + 50 years. They transferred their lease one generation down before it was turned over to the feds to help put off the inevitable. When I was kicking the tires on camp ownership I looked at a couple that were on leased land in NH. I ended up getting lucky and finding 0.3 acres and built a camp for about what I would have paid for one of the leased ones. Very glad it worked out that way, it would be gut wrenching to have to tear that place down.

  5. #5
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    I finally had time to watch. Fantastic documentary about camp life and culture and how it trickles down through the generations. Very unfortunate and you can't help but feel for them about the way it ends. Sad. As someone who has access to a few camps, there is nothing like it. Totally different state of mind when you're there. Hard to put into words.
    I love it when a plan comes together!

  6. #6
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    I posted on this earlier but it does not appear to show up. I am about 1/2 way through, it is a long video, and am really enjoying it. The allure of "getting' ta camp" is real for sure. It is my favorite week of the year bar none. I actually appreciate the balance with the film thus far. It is not a "too bad for those leaseholders", nor is it "screw the state or federal govt". It is an unfortunate/difficult situation for so many, the leaseholders the municipalities and generations of outdoorsmen/women. But boy do I love thinking about camp!
    Thanks for posting!
    Last edited by Gwlambo; 08-12-2017 at 07:41 AM.

  7. #7
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    Great flick if you've ever been to, or part of, a camp.

    I'm torn. Happy that all that land is protected and preserved for the entire American public. Sad about the loss all of those folks had to suffer- those camps were special places that most of us on here could identify with.

    I feel lucky that our family camp is owned and not leased.
    Not all those who wander are lost. -Tolkien

  8. #8
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    That was a nice film, thanks for sharing!
    My people call me "Stands on Logging Roads."

  9. #9
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    Thanks for posting the link...fantastic documentary. The UP has such a great hunting and camp tradition. All of those folks seem like people you wouldn't mind spending a couple weeks at deer camp with. What a tremendous loss for these families. However, it seems that most of them have greatly benefitted from the opportunity despite the ending. I didn't hear any of them saying that they regretted the years that they spent there and would have done it differently if they had known. By all accounts they got their moneys worth and then some. Inevitably this kind of thing comes with the territory of leased land and is one of the reasons I would not even consider it. Fortunately these lands remain open to hunting and recreation for everyone.

  10. #10
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    Just started watching this. Makes me want to find my special place for my family and friends that much more. Also feel like Mbvt. Torn on public land issue versus family's losing their special places.
    Last edited by Fixed blade; 08-13-2017 at 05:12 PM.

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