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Thread: 2018 Trap Line

  1. #321
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    In the Oak Hickory plain.
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    4,835

    Default Run Forrest!

    I have enough wood for probably 1 and 1/2 to almost 2 years and have been thinking I should sit back on future wood sources. Though, last night I came into another source and figured what the hell. My body could use another good @ss whipping to remind myself how good the good times are and the ability to drag a deer out of the woods with ease this fall.

    I cooked up 6 eggs and a half pound of bacon this morning to gear up myself for the day.

    I didnít get a picture of the first load but I did on the second.

    I fit three loads in two and am happy the driving distance was short.

    Todayís second load is pictured below:


    Attachment 20804
    Last edited by outdoorsman; 10-10-2018 at 03:59 PM.
    Leave my rifle, my fishing pole, my traps, and leave me be.

  2. #322
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Southern Vermont
    Posts
    3,225

    Default

    That trailer was a score. Could you throw sideboards on it, or do you think you'd start pushing the weight capacity?

  3. #323
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    In the Oak Hickory plain.
    Posts
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    Default

    I was thinking the same as I loaded the trailer yesterday. It has two 3,500 pound rated axles which gives me room for some side boards. I figure the last pictured load was about 4,000 pounds.
    Leave my rifle, my fishing pole, my traps, and leave me be.

  4. #324
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    In the Oak Hickory plain.
    Posts
    4,835

    Default Woodboogering Maintenance

    Put my saw on the bench to touch up the chain this evening. Trick to a fast cutting chain is a sharp point, equal tooth lengths, and proper raker height. I’ve cut about 18 cord with this chain.

    My favorite file guide:

    261F6E81-315A-4BB9-B6C4-95BF80B2B045.jpeg

    33581507-0BBD-4A88-8B67-A2FA9A902CC3.jpeg

    What 18 cords does to a chain - New versus existing cutter:

    FE7A5736-2B55-4E19-B4A9-2EA17A6BE83C.jpeg

    5B9F8486-2DB1-4F70-865D-26A5A14F07C0.jpeg

    Roughly 10 years ago Bailey’s online forestry supply had a sale on 3/8 chain in 100 foot rolls. As a young adult I often thought how interesting it would be to cut and rivet my own chain. Been doing it for years now!

    FE566CEC-3D49-4C92-9B55-0477E3E3025A.jpeg
    Last edited by outdoorsman; 08-09-2018 at 08:33 PM.
    Leave my rifle, my fishing pole, my traps, and leave me be.

  5. #325
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Central Vermont
    Posts
    2,422

    Default

    I’ve retired a couple chains that were worn that thin. When they get that thin the bar can sometimes build friction in the cut because the kerf is so thin. I doubt many people get that much use out of chains these days. A+ in frugality!
    Last edited by 802-603hunter; 08-09-2018 at 08:46 PM.

  6. #326
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    In the Oak Hickory plain.
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    Default

    Sure does pinch sometimes. I tried going past the witness marks once and found out the kerf was too narrow. Another time I tried cutting a large standing dead oak with a chain filed to the witness marks. That didn’t work out so good either. A number of cutters broke off and getting the cut finished required some finess in the narrow kerf.

    My favorite chain use is when the chain is half way filed down and beyond. At the half point and to just about where the pictured chain is is when I find chains to be cutting with the most speed and efficiency.

    Downfall with such large opening between the rakers and cutters is the bar tip can really bite in and kick back.
    Last edited by outdoorsman; 08-10-2018 at 08:44 AM.
    Leave my rifle, my fishing pole, my traps, and leave me be.

  7. #327
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    In the Oak Hickory plain.
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    Default

    My daughter and I planted the food plot last weekend and as of today it’s growing. I used a mix off the shelf from Tractor Supply. It was all plant species which deer prefer after a frost. The trail camera picked up a picture of a deer passing through in the plot the other morning . I couldn’t tell if it was a buck or doe on my tiny viewing screen.

    October can’t come soon enough.

    DCD580F9-35AF-4133-A64F-CAF08BA0AD09.jpeg
    Leave my rifle, my fishing pole, my traps, and leave me be.

  8. #328
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
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    994

    Default

    How often do you file your chain and do you always use the clamp on guide to file?

    I have been trying to improve my chain sharpening skills. So far I have adapted to using the file holder / guide to keep the file riding high (not using the guide I found I was allowing the round file to ride low in the tooth and thereby file into the chain itself) and to maintain the correct angle of the file.

    I have been "touching up" the chain after every tank of gas by doing 2 or 3 strokes on the teeth. If I hit something when cutting (ground/stone/dirt) I look for the worst buggered tooth then count the strokes to bring it back then do that same number of strokes to each tooth to keep the teeth evenly sharpened.

    I have been using the flat file to file the rakers down but doing this without a gauge to determine how far down I should file them.

  9. #329
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    In the Oak Hickory plain.
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    Default

    I always use the roller guide and will make 2 light passes with the file after each tank of gas when cutting firewood. I have tried filing with no guide and found I am not good or at free hand filing. If I have dirty wood I’ll up it to 4 file strokes. If I hit a rock, or totally screw up and hit ground, I immediately sharpen. Number of strokes then depends on worst tooth.

    I always use a gauge to set the raker height. I like a saw to be smooth and self feeding. I find rakers have a significant effect on those behaviors.

    I have found that if I keep a chain well touched up and razor sharp that I get a higher number of cut cords per chain. Also, I heavily dislike muscling a saw through a log. Doing so adds quite a bit of bar and engine wear.

    Excluding the 2100, my saw engines are heavily modified and pistons will melt if I run a dull chain. Suffice to say I spend a lot time filing chains.
    Leave my rifle, my fishing pole, my traps, and leave me be.

  10. #330
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    994

    Default

    Thank you for the feedback outdoorsman. I have a gauge for the rakers, I guess I will start using it. I have a 10 cord pile of logs to saw up and split so I'll keep your tips in mind. My saws (Stihl 025 w/ 16" bar and 391 w/ 20" bar) are stock. I rotate between the 2, run one through a tank of fuel then set it aside to cool and grab the other and keep cutting, servicing the cooled saw in between, rinse and repeat. The 391 is my preferred saw. The longer bar and increased power make quick work of the logs. Some of my logs are small diameter so the 025 works fine on them.

    Thanks again for the feedback

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