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Thread: How much meat should you get back from the butcher???

  1. #11
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    from the butcher and packer website...

    http://http://www.butcher-packer.com...roducts_id=331

    How Much Meat Will Your Deer Yield?
    Does and bucks from similar age classes yield similar amounts of venison. You likely won't see big differences in meat yields until you can compare a mature buck with the rest of the meat-pole crowd.
    The typical Northern fawn, which includes "button bucks," weighs about 55 to 75 pounds field dressed, while a healthy doe fawn weighs 45 to 65 pounds field dressed. Southern fawns weigh less - sometimes less than 30 pounds field dressed.
    Yearling bucks, which range from small spikes to basket-racked 10-pointers, typically weigh 105 to 125 pounds.
    Northern does weigh 105 to 120 pounds field dressed.
    For decades, some hunters have relied on chest-girth charts to estimate live weights of deer. Unfortunately, such charts are often inaccurate because - among other things - they don't account for fluctuations in the body sizes of bucks before and after the rut. Most biologists put no stock in any weight estimates based on chest-girth measurements.
    A hunter can obtain a ball-park estimate of his deer's live weight by multiplying its field-dressed weight by 1.28. This number came about after comparing it with several chest-girth charts. Granted, this estimate won't pass muster with biologists, but it should be good enough for deer-camp comparisons. For example, a yearling buck with a field-dressed weight of 125 pounds will have an estimated live weight of 160 pounds.
    Misconceptions
    By misjudging field-dressed weights of whitetails, hunters often have unrealistic expectations of how much venison they should receive from their butcher. Many aspects combine to determine venison yields. Although a neck-shot mature buck can yield a big amount of steaks, chops, hamburger and stew meat, the amount of meat seems minuscule when compared to the meat yield of domestic animals.
    All animals are built a little different. For hogs, almost everything is used - bacon, hocks, etc. A deer has long legs with little meat on them, whereas steers have the same bone structure (but with more meat). It's the muscle and fat that make them different.
    Although it would be convenient to say a deer's meat yield is equal to 50 percent of its field-dressed weight, it wouldn't be totally accurate. A buck's condition plays a large role in how much boneless venison it will yield.
    Meat Yields (In Pounds)
    Animal
    Weight*
    Meat
    Waste
    %Meat
    Lamb**
    50
    40
    10
    80%
    Hog
    240
    189
    51
    79%
    Black Angus
    600
    438
    162
    73%
    Holstein Steer
    900
    513
    387
    57%
    Mature Buck
    180
    72
    108
    40%

    *Carcass weight. Head, hide and intestines removed
    **University of Wisconsin research
    The Equation for Venison Yield
    Hunters can learn more about their deer and how much venison it will yield by first obtaining an accurate field-dressed weight. This figure helps determine the deer's carcass weight - the deer's body weight minus its head, hide and innards. From there, it's easy to calculate how much venison is on the carcass.
    It's important to note that this equation assumes that no part of the deer is lost to waste from tissue damage. Obviously, a deer suffering bullet - or to a lesser extent, arrow - damage to its back, hams, shoulders or neck will yield substantially less venison. Therefore, it includes calculations for "ideal" meat yield - the maximum amount of meat on a deer with nothing being lost to waste, and a "realistic" meat yield - the amount of meat a hunter can expect to receive after subtracting the pounds of meat lost to bullet/broadhead damage.
    The equation does not account for meat that must be removed after being ruined by stomach contents or overexposure to warm weather.
    Remember, to use the equation, first obtain an accurate field-dressed weight.
    How Much Does it Weigh?
    Mature white-tailed deer can be heavy, but much of their weight is distributed in non-meat areas. Here are some examples of how weight is distributed in Northern deer. (live weights in parenthesis)
    Hide Factor
    Fawn: (100 pounds) 6.7 percent
    Adult doe: (140 pounds) 7.9 percent
    Adult buck (160 pounds) 8.7 percent
    Bucks: more than 160 pounds 9 percent
    Bone Factor
    Fawn: (100 pounds) 13.8 percent
    Adult doe: (140 pounds) 13 percent
    Adult buck (160 pounds) 12.4 percent
    Bucks: more than 160 pounds 11.7 percent
    Blood Factor
    Fawn: (100 pounds) 6 percent
    Adult doe: (140 pounds) 5 percent
    Adult buck (160 pounds) 5 percent
    Bucks: more than 160 pounds 5 percent
    Using this guide as an example, a 180-pound buck would have 16.2 pounds of hide, 21.06 pounds of bones and 9 pounds of blood. Unfortunately, it's difficult to estimate the live weight of a deer if it has been field-dressed because the weight of a deer's innards varies depending on its health and diet.
    - Pennsylvania State University, Department of Animal Science and the Pennsylvania Game Commission, 1968
    Our Thanks to DEER & DEERHUNTING Magazine for the use of this information.
    Carcass weight = Field-dressed weight divided by 1.331
    Ideal boneless venison weight = Carcass weight multiplied by .67
    Realistic venison yield = Ideal boneless weight multiplied by .70
    Let's say a hunter kills a mature buck, and it weighs 165 pounds field-dressed. Using the above equation, we estimate its carcass will weigh 124 pounds, and it will ideally yield 83.08 pounds of boneless meat. The deer's realistic meat yield is about 58.15 pounds.
    Because waste can vary between deer, we suggest using the "realistic" figure as a gauge. In the above example, the buck's realistic meat yield would range form 58 to 68 pounds. A 10-pound difference doesn't seem like much when dealing with a large deer , but it's noticeable when the deer is a fawn or yearling.
    Conclusion
    In most cases, hunters will likely see little difference in meat yields between the deer they shoot. Does and bucks from similar age classes yield similar amounts of venison. In fact, don't expect to see big differences in your net venison yield unless you're comparing relatively young deer with a big, mature, deep-chested buck.
    ...

  2. #12

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    Thanks MBullism. Very interesting info. Still @ 21 lbs. of meat they're saying my doe weighed under 75 Lbs.? I got screwed. My buddy got a doe the day after I did that was much smaller than mine and he butchered it himself. He didn't have as nice shot placement either. He prob. got twice the meat i did and he doesn't grind so he had a lot of waste too.

  3. #13
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    This was one of the reasons I started doing my own. I'm not getting "down" on anyone that cuts deer, but realistically this is the busy season for these guys... there just aint time for them to go through the hassle of what I can... especially when ten more deer just came through the door. Once I started cutting my own, I stopped shooting smaller deer and gave them a pass. They can be twice the work for half the meat. If I had a mountain of little to average sized deer to cut up for people, I'd be less fussy about it too. I'm just sayin', it might not be 'cause the butcher looked well fed

    .02
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MBullism View Post
    but realistically this is the busy season for these guys... there just aint time for them to go through the hassle of what I can... especially when ten more deer just came through the door.
    That is exactly it. Plus everyone always thinks they should get back more than they really should. For that reason one of the places out here gives you an appointment. They cut it up in front of you so you cannot bitch.

    I cut my own when I have time and the finished product is always so much nicer.
    The days in agony are over. It won't happen again, Honest injun.....


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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chucklej View Post
    Thanks MBullism. Very interesting info. Still @ 21 lbs. of meat they're saying my doe weighed under 75 Lbs.? I got screwed.
    Tough to say without an actual accurate weight before you dropped it off. Figuring that it was 100 lbs doesnt cut it. Kinda like those who figure they caught a 5 pound bass but didnt ever weigh it. Truth is 99% of those fish are usually only about 3 pounds max. People just dont estimate well.

    One other thing that happens sometimes is an old injury. I have cut several deer that we have lost significant amounts of meat to infected portions you could not tell they had till you cut them open and the pus started streaming out. One was a broken leg, prob car hit, two others had imbedded broadheads near the spine.

    Bottom line is maybe you got screwed and maybe you did not. You really do not know because you really do not know how much you deer weighed dressed and even if it was as big as you think it was there are things that could reduce the yeild to what you recieved back.
    The days in agony are over. It won't happen again, Honest injun.....


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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by arlow View Post
    Plus everyone always thinks they should get back more than they really should.

    I run into this all the time when selling beef by the side. Most people just don't realize how much bone is in an animal. They also don't understand the relationship between hanging weight and actual edible meat. I've had more people complain to me because they bought a beef creature that weighed 1200 lbs live, paid for 900lbs hanging weight for cutting and wrapping, and only got about 500 lbs of meat.
    Magnum PI

  7. #17
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    Took a 70ish pound dressed doe to a realgood butcher and got a little over 26 pounds back. That with pork added , freezer vac bags and brow bags it was in.
    Last edited by D Letho; 12-02-2009 at 12:52 PM.

  8. #18
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    99 % of the time I butcher my own deer. A few years back I shot a spike during archery season. The weather was hot and I couldn't get to it right away. I took it to a butcher. His policy is to have the owner there when he cuts up the deer, like Arlow's butcher.A lot of people over estimate how much meat they'll end up with. Having said that ,21 lbs. from an adult doe seems awful light.

  9. #19
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    my wife and I butcher all the deer here...I can just imagine a butcher having 40 deer hanging trying to get thru them all...I bet the meat gets mixed up, someone could have inadvertantly put your meat in another box or something...I wouldn't quite say the guy is a crook, mistakes do happen, that could be the case.
    Fresh horses and beer for all my friends...FOR TONITE WE RIDE!!!!

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chucklej View Post
    Shot placement was right on the money got lungs. E. thing deboned. Yes, the bucher does look like he eats very well. No ribs, backstraps cut into 4 pieces, and only got 2 roasts back. THe front shoulder should not have been messed up.
    You only get two roasts out of a deer, the front shoulders. The rear legs is where you get your steaks from. I never eat deer ribs on the bone, I cut the meat out of the ribs and put it in the to be grinded pile. Ive never seen a butcher pack ribs either. With the backstraps it depends what mood im in. Sometimes i make chops, sometimes i debone the meat, and throw in on the grill. The neck meat is grind pile as well. With where you said you put your bullet, and depending on caliper, you lost rib meat, and possibly some strap meat. It all depends about entrance wound and exit wound (the angle of the shot).

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